Category Archives: GUEST EDITOR

From The Desk Of Jesca Hoop: Wheat Berry Bags

The first thing you notice about singer/songwriter Jesca Hoop’s seventh full-length is how spare it sounds, each song assembled only from two or three instrumental elements and Hoop’s warm-yet-adaptive, shape-shifting voice. Then you stop hearing that sparseness, so rich does the album sound. Somewhere near a half-hour into its 40-minute running time, it hits you again, and you start wondering how the hell Memories Are Now can sound so expansive, considering its skeletal arrangements. Hoop will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our feature.

Hoop: I am quite proactive when it comes to pain relief. One of my go-to items for pain relief are these bags that are filled with whole wheat berries and lavender. You stick ’em in the microwave for three to four minutes and they get piping hot. I use them generally for shoulder pain, menstrual cramps, warming my feet and also heating the bed. The wheat and lavender have a soothing aroma.

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From The Desk Of Jesca Hoop: Gibson ES 140

]\The first thing you notice about singer/songwriter Jesca Hoop’s seventh full-length is how spare it sounds, each song assembled only from two or three instrumental elements and Hoop’s warm-yet-adaptive, shape-shifting voice. Then you stop hearing that sparseness, so rich does the album sound. Somewhere near a half-hour into its 40-minute running time, it hits you again, and you start wondering how the hell Memories Are Now can sound so expansive, considering its skeletal arrangements. Hoop will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our feature.

Hoop: I’ve been playing guitars for 22 years, not that one could tell. I have enjoyed many guitars over time, but I’ve only ever loved one, my white Gibson ES 140 slimline 3/4-scale hollow body that came to me by the hands of my great friend and musical collaborator Blake Mills. It got a rich dark tone somewhat like a cello. It’s super light and small, and it travels with me all around the world. True love.

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From The Desk Of Jesca Hoop: “Waiting For Guffman”

The first thing you notice about singer/songwriter Jesca Hoop’s seventh full-length is how spare it sounds, each song assembled only from two or three instrumental elements and Hoop’s warm-yet-adaptive, shape-shifting voice. Then you stop hearing that sparseness, so rich does the album sound. Somewhere near a half-hour into its 40-minute running time, it hits you again, and you start wondering how the hell Memories Are Now can sound so expansive, considering its skeletal arrangements. Hoop will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our feature.

Hoop: I was in Lockhart, Texas, the other day and I recognized beige stone building and the rusted staircase that steps up to the home of Corky Sinclair where he is inside biting his pillow. I stood under the awning at the D&Q where Libby Mae was fanning her chicken wing. This is my favorite all-time movie, perhaps because I’ve got versions of Corky and Libby on my own, past life.

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From The Desk Of Jesca Hoop: Sauna And Ice Plunge

The first thing you notice about singer/songwriter Jesca Hoop’s seventh full-length is how spare it sounds, each song assembled only from two or three instrumental elements and Hoop’s warm-yet-adaptive, shape-shifting voice. Then you stop hearing that sparseness, so rich does the album sound. Somewhere near a half-hour into its 40-minute running time, it hits you again, and you start wondering how the hell Memories Are Now can sound so expansive, considering its skeletal arrangements. Hoop will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our feature.

Hoop: As a health practice, I regularly visit saunas and move from hot rooms to ice-cold plunge pools and back and forth again and again. This gets the blood flowing and releases all sorts of tension. Not to mention I drink a lot of water in the process. I leave feeling new. Without this practice, I certainly feel that I’m missing something.

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From The Desk Of Jesca Hoop: Coconut Oil

The first thing you notice about singer/songwriter Jesca Hoop’s seventh full-length is how spare it sounds, each song assembled only from two or three instrumental elements and Hoop’s warm-yet-adaptive, shape-shifting voice. Then you stop hearing that sparseness, so rich does the album sound. Somewhere near a half-hour into its 40-minute running time, it hits you again, and you start wondering how the hell Memories Are Now can sound so expansive, considering its skeletal arrangements. Hoop will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our feature.

Hoop: I start ever day with a tablespoon of cold-pressed coconut oil. Coconut oil is great for the heart, and I’m certain it’s doing great things.

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From The Desk Of Jesca Hoop: Turmeric Ginger Tonic

The first thing you notice about singer/songwriter Jesca Hoop’s seventh full-length is how spare it sounds, each song assembled only from two or three instrumental elements and Hoop’s warm-yet-adaptive, shape-shifting voice. Then you stop hearing that sparseness, so rich does the album sound. Somewhere near a half-hour into its 40-minute running time, it hits you again, and you start wondering how the hell Memories Are Now can sound so expansive, considering its skeletal arrangements. Hoop will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our feature.

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Hoop: Every morning I start by making a fresh turmeric ginger tonic. Turmeric is a powerful anti-inflammatory and is vibrant yellow. Our bodies love vibrant yellow foods … well,  foods of any vibrant color to be fair. But I have a particular attraction to this yellow. There is joy in this little yummy and medicinal treat.

This is what you need:
Juicer
Tumeric: two or three medium sized bulbs
Ginger: two-inch section, for spicy result
One lemon juiced with the peel on
One-half fresh apple
Ground black pepper for absorption

Toss turmeric, ginger, lemon and apple into a juicer and press. Add a few grinds of black pepper, stir and drink.

You can drink this in a strong concentrate or water it down if you wish.

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From The Desk Of Biffy Clyro: Sleep

With Ellipsis, Biffy Clyro’s seventh record, Simon Neil and his bandmates for the past two decades—bassist James Johnston and twin brother Ben Johnston on drums—wanted to make sure that they weren’t becoming too predictable. Ellipsis covers familiar sonic territory for Biffy—blistering hard melodic rock with a touch of ’90s alternativity and a quick taste of sweet-tart pop—while offering a furiously contemporary energy. Biffy Clyro will be editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our feature.

James Johnston: During another restless night in the tour-bus bunk, I began to wonder … how many years of my life will be spent sleeping? Or in this case, how many hours am I wasting trying to sleep? What time should I reset my alarm for since I’ve been staring at the tourbus roof for three hours? What time zone are we even in just now? When does the sun rise here? What time is soundcheck? In an attempt to ease my racing mind, I start to calculate my original question—it should be eight hours a night, a third of my day, therefore a third of my life. But what happens when I snooze my alarm for an hour every day? One extra hour in bed a day equates to 27,375 hours in a lifetime, 1,140 days or 3.125 years. Just as I’ve finished my calculations, I hear the kick drum start for soundcheck. I guess that answers that question, too.

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From The Desk Of Biffy Clyro: Vinyl

With Ellipsis, Biffy Clyro’s seventh record, Simon Neil and his bandmates for the past two decades—bassist James Johnston and twin brother Ben Johnston on drums—wanted to make sure that they weren’t becoming too predictable. Ellipsis covers familiar sonic territory for Biffy—blistering hard melodic rock with a touch of ’90s alternativity and a quick taste of sweet-tart pop—while offering a furiously contemporary energy. Biffy Clyro will be editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our feature.

James Johnston: In a world where so much of what we use and interact with is virtual, the human brain is naturally attracted to something that is tangible, tactile and items that you can own and cherish—that is why I love vinyl. I come from a generation that often had a turnable at home, but my parents were tricked into buying their whole record collection again on CD because it “sounded better and was convenient.” Unfortunately they binned their entire vinyl collection, which means there will be nothing for me to inherit! I guess I will be handing down my music collection on a USB stick.

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From The Desk Of Biffy Clyro: A Li(f)e In The Day

With Ellipsis, Biffy Clyro’s seventh record, Simon Neil and his bandmates for the past two decades—bassist James Johnston and twin brother Ben Johnston on drums—wanted to make sure that they weren’t becoming too predictable. Ellipsis covers familiar sonic territory for Biffy—blistering hard melodic rock with a touch of ’90s alternativity and a quick taste of sweet-tart pop—while offering a furiously contemporary energy. Biffy Clyro will be editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our feature.

Simon Neil: My day normally starts at 5:45 a.m. with an extremely intense karate session at my dojo: I normally train with Raymond, who I have been working on and off with over the past 24 years or so. After my session finishes, I like to stock up on some protein, and so out come the three or four roast chickens I am forced to devour each day. This routine is how I begin every day, no matter where I am in the world, on-tour or off-tour. At 9 a.m. I like to spend an hour on my French and German studies and, if I am lucky, my written Korean, too. I am currently putting together a collection of all of my musings and writings, circa 2006-2009, so keep an eye out—they should be published and released in 2019. We will then head to the venue for the day’s show; at this stage of our career I refuse to travel in any position other than horizontal, much to gravity’s relief (and my tour manager’s chagrin)! Car, plane, train, piggyback: it is horizontal all the way for me. Upon arriving at the venue, I begin vocal warmups, life warmups, swimming warmups, heat warmups, warm-up warmups, cool-down warmups, and by this point we are ready to hit the stage for soundcheck. Now that we have expanded to a 14-piece live band, we find it incredibly hard to incorporate our earlier, popular dance moves, but this means that we really get to savour our freestyle, improv hour that we practise over and over until the entire section is  perfected. Once soundcheck is over, I like to medicate, meditate, micro dose, masturbate, commiserate, burn all the master tapes, liberate the illiterates, fight the Crazy 88s, etc., etc., mate … After a dinner of four further chickens, it will almost be “show time,” so we begin hand-holding, give thanks to the gods of rock and—with subtle flamboyance—make our way to the stage. After such a long time as a band, it is hard not to rely on superstitions and routines; I, for example, will always slip on and tie up my left football boot first and kiss all the performers in alphabetical order (which can be particularly difficult when you tour with four sets of identical twins, and you are 15 points down going into the third quarter … ) and then slip on my right boot. I cannot put into words the feeling which performing onstage gives me, so I am not going to. I “come to” after the show, roughly around 11 p.m., and will be informed as to whether the show was a success or not. I like to speak with Bono, Vin Diesel or Father John Misty post-show, to  get a balanced view of the gig. Once Bono has finished talking, it is normally around 2.15 a.m. After 20-25 minutes of pounding acai berries, I will drift off, knowing that tomorrow will be exactly the same.

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From The Desk Of Biffy Clyro: Cats

With Ellipsis, Biffy Clyro’s seventh record, Simon Neil and his bandmates for the past two decades—bassist James Johnston and twin brother Ben Johnston on drums—wanted to make sure that they weren’t becoming too predictable. Ellipsis covers familiar sonic territory for Biffy—blistering hard melodic rock with a touch of ’90s alternativity and a quick taste of sweet-tart pop—while offering a furiously contemporary energy. Biffy Clyro will be editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our feature.

Ben Johnston: By no means am I an anti-dog person but my love for cats is becoming close to unhealthy. We have three cats so far (Fergus, Douglas and Moira), and if I’m not careful there will be more in my house when I arrive back from tour. Affection from cats is hard earned and some owners never experience any whatsoever, but if you handle your moggy from an early age, you’re sure to get a purring puddle of love when you need it most. I love how independent and aloof they can be; that is, of course, until they want fed and turn on the manipulation and feline charm. One of the best skills a cat possesses is having the ability to sense when you’re either ill or feeling down. It’s also been proven that spending time stroking the fluffy wee devils helps to lower both anxiety levels and blood pressure. So if you’re feeling uptight and stressed, get yourself a cat … or three!

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