Category Archives: GUEST EDITOR

From The Desk Of Failure: It’s Never Gonna Be Like The First Time Again

Failure’s new album, The Heart Is A Monster, is an unexpected surprise. After a two-decade absence and a parade of band/side projects, guitarist/vocalist Ken Andrews, bassist/vocalist Greg Edwards and drummer Kellii Scott reconvened to follow up 1996’s critically acclaimed and commercially ignored Fantastic Planet. Monster sounds contemporarily fresh, and yet still feels like a logical next step 19 years after its predecessor. Failure will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our new feature on them.

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Scott: Often I think of how wonderful and big music was when I was a kid. Of how you could rely on your favorite band to take you away from it all to a new place that never existed before the first listen. I miss when music affected me that way. I wish I could go back to that place. Sadly, I cannot. Listening to music now is more a function of the head and not the heart. There are a few exceptions, but unfortunatley not many. I think it’s probably because I’m much more informed now, and much more prone to dissection and understanding of my craft as opposed to just the enjoyment of it.

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From The Desk Of Failure: Thanatos

Failure’s new album, The Heart Is A Monster, is an unexpected surprise. After a two-decade absence and a parade of band/side projects, guitarist/vocalist Ken Andrews, bassist/vocalist Greg Edwards and drummer Kellii Scott reconvened to follow up 1996’s critically acclaimed and commercially ignored Fantastic Planet. Monster sounds contemporarily fresh, and yet still feels like a logical next step 19 years after its predecessor. Failure will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our new feature on them.

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Edwards: When someone says they’re not afraid to die, does that mean they’re not afraid to suffer life-ending injuries while conscious and eventually succumb to mortality in untold volumes of pain and fear? Or do they simply mean they are not afraid to turn off and cease to exist. To become what they were, in an abstract sense—at least, before they were born? That, it seems to me, is not something to brag about. Actually, neither is the former.

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From The Desk Of Failure: When Cats Dream

Failure’s new album, The Heart Is A Monster, is an unexpected surprise. After a two-decade absence and a parade of band/side projects, guitarist/vocalist Ken Andrews, bassist/vocalist Greg Edwards and drummer Kellii Scott reconvened to follow up 1996’s critically acclaimed and commercially ignored Fantastic Planet. Monster sounds contemporarily fresh, and yet still feels like a logical next step 19 years after its predecessor. Failure will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our new feature on them.

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Scott: I just found out that cats dream, and I immediately wondered what it is that they must dream about. Is it chasing and catching vermin all day? Maybe coming upon huge stashes of cat nip to roll in and become exceedingly intoxicated? Of course cat’s dream; every being dreams. I think they probably dream of being petted and scratched all day long while coming in and out of consciousness and with, perhaps, a mouse on a string to terrorize when they get bored of bliss.

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From The Desk Of Failure: Popcorn

Failure’s new album, The Heart Is A Monster, is an unexpected surprise. After a two-decade absence and a parade of band/side projects, guitarist/vocalist Ken Andrews, bassist/vocalist Greg Edwards and drummer Kellii Scott reconvened to follow up 1996’s critically acclaimed and commercially ignored Fantastic Planet. Monster sounds contemporarily fresh, and yet still feels like a logical next step 19 years after its predecessor. Failure will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our new feature on them.

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Edwards: Movies I’ve had on my mind: The Great Beauty (2013) directed by Paolo Sorrentino. What De Palma is to Hitchcock, this film is to Fellini. One of the most fully formed characters I’ve ever seen on screen. About as close as film gets to literature in creating a fictional human. Holy Motors (2012) directed by Leo Carax. This guy is friends with Scott Walker and this movie is weird, cool and profound. Pather Panchali, Aparjito and Apur Sansur. The “Apu” trilogy from the ’50s from director Satyajit Ray. A beautiful hypnotic journey and very forward thinking for its time and culture. The ambient sound design and Ravi Shankar score are mesmerizing. Kellii’s wife Priscilla, our resident photographer, documented, with journalistic neutrality, the carnage I left behind after watching Ray’s masterpiece.

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From The Desk Of Failure: It’s A Fantastic Movie

Failure’s new album, The Heart Is A Monster, is an unexpected surprise. After a two-decade absence and a parade of band/side projects, guitarist/vocalist Ken Andrews, bassist/vocalist Greg Edwards and drummer Kellii Scott reconvened to follow up 1996’s critically acclaimed and commercially ignored Fantastic Planet. Monster sounds contemporarily fresh, and yet still feels like a logical next step 19 years after its predecessor. Failure will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our new feature on them.

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Scott: I’m looking to be entertained after hours and decide on a movie I haven’t seen since we recorded Fantastic Planet. The Cook, The Thief, His Wife & Her Lover pops into my skull. First, I forgot how much I absolutely hate the main character, played by Michael Gambon. A violent, cruel and mostly annoying mobster who won’t shut up or stop hurting people throughout the entire film. The other main character is the always beautiful and talented Helen Mirren, who cascades through the film, endlessly wearing gorgeous costumes from one lush scene to another. This is one of the most uniquely designed films I’ve ever seen, and the colors and endless long dolly shots further place it in a category of visual stunning of its own. A classic love trinagle and ultimate revenge film that if you you haven’t seen, you should, immediately.

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From The Desk Of Failure: Objects Arranged In Space

Failure’s new album, The Heart Is A Monster, is an unexpected surprise. After a two-decade absence and a parade of band/side projects, guitarist/vocalist Ken Andrews, bassist/vocalist Greg Edwards and drummer Kellii Scott reconvened to follow up 1996’s critically acclaimed and commercially ignored Fantastic Planet. Monster sounds contemporarily fresh, and yet still feels like a logical next step 19 years after its predecessor. Failure will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our new feature on them.

Alias

Edwards: Rediscovering the used bookstore … I thought they were all gone. Shamefully, Amazon had become my bookstore, but then recently I wandered into Alias Books on Glendale Boulevard in Atwater Village, Los Angeles (electrified by a Cortado and Financier sugar rush from Proof Bakery across the street). I was greeted by an attractive, topless, full-breasted brunette reading Ulysses; it was only a photograph on the wall, but I readily absorbed and understood the message and there was no turning back. It’s not a big store, but they curate their selection well. I’ve been there four or five times now and I’ve never left empty handed and never found myself at home with a dud. Finding unknown gems is easy. Like Selected Longer Poems by A. R. Ammons, a writer from the ‘50s, ‘60s, ‘70s I’d never heard of but instantly resonated with. Here’s an excerpt. If you don’t like poetry, go fuck yourself:

… Through the reeds somewhere, as by a
Paddy or ditch in the head,
Wind burrs
a leaf: the woman flutters,
Her grief absolute and
Not a mystery:
How can I know I
Am not
Trying to know my way into feeling
As
Feeling
Tries to feel its way into knowing:
It’s indifferent what I say: the motions
By which
I move
Manifest
Merely a deeper congruence
Where the structures are…

(From Pray Without Ceasing —A. R. Ammons)

 

 

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From the Desk Of Failure: It Works Everytime

Failure’s new album, The Heart Is A Monster, is an unexpected surprise. After a two-decade absence and a parade of band/side projects, guitarist/vocalist Ken Andrews, bassist/vocalist Greg Edwards and drummer Kellii Scott reconvened to follow up 1996’s critically acclaimed and commercially ignored Fantastic Planet. Monster sounds contemporarily fresh, and yet still feels like a logical next step 19 years after its predecessor. Failure will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our new feature on them.

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Scott: Just got through listening to Physical Graffiti for the billionth time. Holy shit! It still sounds as fresh and exciting as the first time I heard it as a kid. All Zep records transcent the date they were released. Every note perfectly placed and felt and with the energy and taste that to this day rivals most, if not all, current bands. The beautiful space they create, the balance of melody and power that each member just oozes and how they seamlessly compliment one another. It’s so evil and delicious. I could, as a matter of fact, survive completely content on an island with only one of either of their genius workds. Get out the LED!

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From The Desk Of Failure: “Homogenic”

Failure’s new album, The Heart Is A Monster, is an unexpected surprise. After a two-decade absence and a parade of band/side projects, guitarist/vocalist Ken Andrews, bassist/vocalist Greg Edwards and drummer Kellii Scott reconvened to follow up 1996’s critically acclaimed and commercially ignored Fantastic Planet. Monster sounds contemporarily fresh, and yet still feels like a logical next step 19 years after its predecessor. Failure will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our new feature on them.

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Edwards: I just want to pay respect to how well Björk’s Homogenic holds up. Hasn’t aged a second. In fact, it still sounds like it hasn’t been released yet.

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From The Desk Of Failure: I Recently Acquired …

Failure’s new album, The Heart Is A Monster, is an unexpected surprise. After a two-decade absence and a parade of band/side projects, guitarist/vocalist Ken Andrews, bassist/vocalist Greg Edwards and drummer Kellii Scott reconvened to follow up 1996’s critically acclaimed and commercially ignored Fantastic Planet. Monster sounds contemporarily fresh, and yet still feels like a logical next step 19 years after its predecessor. Failure will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our new feature on them.

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Scott: I recently acquired all of the re-released Iron Maiden 180-gram vinyl and have been kicked back to my teenage years. Easily one of my favorite metal bands, I couldn’t even begin to tally how many hours I spent in my formative years jamming along with these records and ripping off drummers Clive Burr and Nico McBrain. I once waited outside their recording studio for hours, over the course of several days, to get all of their autographs. If you ever have the opportunity, purchase either The Number Of The Beast or Piece Of Mind, two of the best records ever recorded.

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From The Desk Of Failure: “Holocaust”

Failure’s new album, The Heart Is A Monster, is an unexpected surprise. After a two-decade absence and a parade of band/side projects, guitarist/vocalist Ken Andrews, bassist/vocalist Greg Edwards and drummer Kellii Scott reconvened to follow up 1996’s critically acclaimed and commercially ignored Fantastic Planet. Monster sounds contemporarily fresh, and yet still feels like a logical next step 19 years after its predecessor. Failure will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our new feature on them.

BigStar

Edwards: Big Star‘s Sister Lovers. This album has two generally disparate dimensions that intertwine with elegant strangeness on this record: economical pop, melancholy genius, and an uncompromising presentation, presumably fostered by drug and personality-damaged recording sessions. The result is a record that I sink deeply into every time I come back to it. The influence of songs like “Big Black Car” and “Holocaust” truly cannot be overstated. The urgent ambivalence in Alex Chilton’s voice never tires my ears. These recordings hold together, just barely, threatening to fall off the track, lose steam completely or blow their engine; the songs aren’t scared. They could survive whatever befalls the machine.

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