Category Archives: GUEST EDITOR

From The Desk Of Cold Specks: Neil Young’s “Don’t Cry”

Singing lines like “Don’t you wait on me/I’ll shoot you down,” her voice is enough to send chills down your spine. But once she steps offstage, the woman who calls herself Al Spx is famously shy and unfailingly distant. “I created a stage name, and it’s allowed me to remove myself from any sort of emotional attachment to the songs,” says Spx, who records under the name Cold Specks, borrowed from James Joyce’s Ulysses. “Al Spx can take care of that. For me, there’s no personal element to the songs anymore, or if there is, it’s disguised.” Two years after releasing I Predict A Graceful Expulsion, Spx is bored with most of the album. Touring is “physically and mentally draining,” and though she still performs the singles, she’s tired of feeling like a bad actress. So, she’s crafted a follow-up, Neuroplasticity (Mute), that’s even bleaker than the first, trading in the acoustic doom-folk of her debut for a richer, more expansive goth-soul that’s one-part sturm and three-parts drang. Spx will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our brand new feature on her.

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Spx: Freedom is by no means Neil’s best work. Some of it is pretty awful. I only hold it close to my heart because it was the first album I ever purchased with my own money. I was a friendless, sheltered, suburbanite child, and he was my hero. “Don’t Cry” is still one of my favourite songs.

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From The Desk Of Cold Specks: How To End This Thing?

Singing lines like “Don’t you wait on me/I’ll shoot you down,” her voice is enough to send chills down your spine. But once she steps offstage, the woman who calls herself Al Spx is famously shy and unfailingly distant. “I created a stage name, and it’s allowed me to remove myself from any sort of emotional attachment to the songs,” says Spx, who records under the name Cold Specks, borrowed from James Joyce’s Ulysses. “Al Spx can take care of that. For me, there’s no personal element to the songs anymore, or if there is, it’s disguised.” Two years after releasing I Predict A Graceful Expulsion, Spx is bored with most of the album. Touring is “physically and mentally draining,” and though she still performs the singles, she’s tired of feeling like a bad actress. So, she’s crafted a follow-up, Neuroplasticity (Mute), that’s even bleaker than the first, trading in the acoustic doom-folk of her debut for a richer, more expansive goth-soul that’s one-part sturm and three-parts drang. Spx will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our brand new feature on her.

VaticanCity

Spx: How to end a week of attempting to communicate with an internet audience? I don’t know. Shall we declare war on the smallest country in the world? Interestingly, this is Vatican City. Uh oh.

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From The Desk Of Cold Specks: Howlin’ Wolf’s “This Is Howlin’ Wolf’s New Album”

Singing lines like “Don’t you wait on me/I’ll shoot you down,” her voice is enough to send chills down your spine. But once she steps offstage, the woman who calls herself Al Spx is famously shy and unfailingly distant. “I created a stage name, and it’s allowed me to remove myself from any sort of emotional attachment to the songs,” says Spx, who records under the name Cold Specks, borrowed from James Joyce’s Ulysses. “Al Spx can take care of that. For me, there’s no personal element to the songs anymore, or if there is, it’s disguised.” Two years after releasing I Predict A Graceful Expulsion, Spx is bored with most of the album. Touring is “physically and mentally draining,” and though she still performs the singles, she’s tired of feeling like a bad actress. So, she’s crafted a follow-up, Neuroplasticity (Mute), that’s even bleaker than the first, trading in the acoustic doom-folk of her debut for a richer, more expansive goth-soul that’s one-part sturm and three-parts drang. Spx will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our brand new feature on her.

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Spx: “This is Howlin’ Wolf’s new album. He doesn’t like it. He didn’t like his electric guitar at first either.”

(I’m pretty boring, I guess)

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From The Desk Of Cold Specks: Doris Duke’s “I’m A Loser”

Singing lines like “Don’t you wait on me/I’ll shoot you down,” her voice is enough to send chills down your spine. But once she steps offstage, the woman who calls herself Al Spx is famously shy and unfailingly distant. “I created a stage name, and it’s allowed me to remove myself from any sort of emotional attachment to the songs,” says Spx, who records under the name Cold Specks, borrowed from James Joyce’s Ulysses. “Al Spx can take care of that. For me, there’s no personal element to the songs anymore, or if there is, it’s disguised.” Two years after releasing I Predict A Graceful Expulsion, Spx is bored with most of the album. Touring is “physically and mentally draining,” and though she still performs the singles, she’s tired of feeling like a bad actress. So, she’s crafted a follow-up, Neuroplasticity (Mute), that’s even bleaker than the first, trading in the acoustic doom-folk of her debut for a richer, more expansive goth-soul that’s one-part sturm and three-parts drang. Spx will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our brand new feature on her.

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Spx: Released in 1969, this Doris Duke record was produced by Swamp Dogg. It was completely disregarded at the time of its release.

“I Don’t Care Anymore” is the most underrated song I’ve ever heard. There’s no point in rambling on about these things. Have a listen and see for yourselves.

Oh, and … best album title, cover combination?

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From The Desk Of Cold Specks: Los Cripis’ “All My Friends Are Dead”

Singing lines like “Don’t you wait on me/I’ll shoot you down,” her voice is enough to send chills down your spine. But once she steps offstage, the woman who calls herself Al Spx is famously shy and unfailingly distant. “I created a stage name, and it’s allowed me to remove myself from any sort of emotional attachment to the songs,” says Spx, who records under the name Cold Specks, borrowed from James Joyce’s Ulysses. “Al Spx can take care of that. For me, there’s no personal element to the songs anymore, or if there is, it’s disguised.” Two years after releasing I Predict A Graceful Expulsion, Spx is bored with most of the album. Touring is “physically and mentally draining,” and though she still performs the singles, she’s tired of feeling like a bad actress. So, she’s crafted a follow-up, Neuroplasticity (Mute), that’s even bleaker than the first, trading in the acoustic doom-folk of her debut for a richer, more expansive goth-soul that’s one-part sturm and three-parts drang. Spx will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our brand new feature on her.

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Spx: Los Cripis are band from Argentina. The video features singer Josi stumbling upon a conspiracy whereby her friends have hidden dismembered parts of her body around their respective apartments. And so, she kills them all with a dead stare.

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From The Desk Of Cold Specks: Rae Sremmurd’s “No Flex Zone”

Singing lines like “Don’t you wait on me/I’ll shoot you down,” her voice is enough to send chills down your spine. But once she steps offstage, the woman who calls herself Al Spx is famously shy and unfailingly distant. “I created a stage name, and it’s allowed me to remove myself from any sort of emotional attachment to the songs,” says Spx, who records under the name Cold Specks, borrowed from James Joyce’s Ulysses. “Al Spx can take care of that. For me, there’s no personal element to the songs anymore, or if there is, it’s disguised.” Two years after releasing I Predict A Graceful Expulsion, Spx is bored with most of the album. Touring is “physically and mentally draining,” and though she still performs the singles, she’s tired of feeling like a bad actress. So, she’s crafted a follow-up, Neuroplasticity (Mute), that’s even bleaker than the first, trading in the acoustic doom-folk of her debut for a richer, more expansive goth-soul that’s one-part sturm and three-parts drang. Spx will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our brand new feature on her.

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Spx: I don’t listen to much music anymore. I’m finding it very difficult to think of things that inspire me. I seem to shut it all out when I’m on the road. I rarely hunt things down myself. I was in the ‘burbs with my brothers recently. They love their hip hop. Have you heard this guy? It’s all right. Ya know? Dude’s like 12.

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From The Desk Of Cold Specks: Strange Encounters, Pecos, Texas

Singing lines like “Don’t you wait on me/I’ll shoot you down,” her voice is enough to send chills down your spine. But once she steps offstage, the woman who calls herself Al Spx is famously shy and unfailingly distant. “I created a stage name, and it’s allowed me to remove myself from any sort of emotional attachment to the songs,” says Spx, who records under the name Cold Specks, borrowed from James Joyce’s Ulysses. “Al Spx can take care of that. For me, there’s no personal element to the songs anymore, or if there is, it’s disguised.” Two years after releasing I Predict A Graceful Expulsion, Spx is bored with most of the album. Touring is “physically and mentally draining,” and though she still performs the singles, she’s tired of feeling like a bad actress. So, she’s crafted a follow-up, Neuroplasticity (Mute), that’s even bleaker than the first, trading in the acoustic doom-folk of her debut for a richer, more expansive goth-soul that’s one-part sturm and three-parts drang. Spx will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our brand new feature on her.

Pecos

Spx: Just met an old cowboy. He had a twirly moustache and the finest boots I’ve ever seen. When I asked him what he did he said, “Retired. Wait right here.” He came back from his truck and handed me his business card. It simply said: Buckshot Deakins. NOTHING.

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From The Desk Of Cold Specks: My Brightest Diamond’s “Hymne A L’amour”

Singing lines like “Don’t you wait on me/I’ll shoot you down,” her voice is enough to send chills down your spine. But once she steps offstage, the woman who calls herself Al Spx is famously shy and unfailingly distant. “I created a stage name, and it’s allowed me to remove myself from any sort of emotional attachment to the songs,” says Spx, who records under the name Cold Specks, borrowed from James Joyce’s Ulysses. “Al Spx can take care of that. For me, there’s no personal element to the songs anymore, or if there is, it’s disguised.” Two years after releasing I Predict A Graceful Expulsion, Spx is bored with most of the album. Touring is “physically and mentally draining,” and though she still performs the singles, she’s tired of feeling like a bad actress. So, she’s crafted a follow-up, Neuroplasticity (Mute), that’s even bleaker than the first, trading in the acoustic doom-folk of her debut for a richer, more expansive goth-soul that’s one-part sturm and three-parts drang. Spx will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our brand new feature on her.

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Spx: I remember when La Blogotheque was the only website filming bands in this way. I was super excited when it first came out some years ago. These days, the internet is infested with these kinds of websites. It’s a total shame. This My Brightest Diamond clip from 2006 is absolutely lovely.

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From The Desk Of Cold Specks: The Strokes’ “Take It Or Leave It” Live On “Letterman”

Singing lines like “Don’t you wait on me/I’ll shoot you down,” her voice is enough to send chills down your spine. But once she steps offstage, the woman who calls herself Al Spx is famously shy and unfailingly distant. “I created a stage name, and it’s allowed me to remove myself from any sort of emotional attachment to the songs,” says Spx, who records under the name Cold Specks, borrowed from James Joyce’s Ulysses. “Al Spx can take care of that. For me, there’s no personal element to the songs anymore, or if there is, it’s disguised.” Two years after releasing I Predict A Graceful Expulsion, Spx is bored with most of the album. Touring is “physically and mentally draining,” and though she still performs the singles, she’s tired of feeling like a bad actress. So, she’s crafted a follow-up, Neuroplasticity (Mute), that’s even bleaker than the first, trading in the acoustic doom-folk of her debut for a richer, more expansive goth-soul that’s one-part sturm and three-parts drang. Spx will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our brand new feature on her.

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Spx: The Strokes‘ first record came out when I was 13. After seeing the “Someday” video on TV, I went to the mall to purchase a pair of Chuck Taylors. The store only had a pair three sizes too big for me. This did not stop me from buying them. Yes, I fell so hard I bought oversized shoes. Speaking of falling … Julian totally takes a tumble.

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From The Desk Of Cold Specks: PJ Harvey’s “White Chalk”

Singing lines like “Don’t you wait on me/I’ll shoot you down,” her voice is enough to send chills down your spine. But once she steps offstage, the woman who calls herself Al Spx is famously shy and unfailingly distant. “I created a stage name, and it’s allowed me to remove myself from any sort of emotional attachment to the songs,” says Spx, who records under the name Cold Specks, borrowed from James Joyce’s Ulysses. “Al Spx can take care of that. For me, there’s no personal element to the songs anymore, or if there is, it’s disguised.” Two years after releasing I Predict A Graceful Expulsion, Spx is bored with most of the album. Touring is “physically and mentally draining,” and though she still performs the singles, she’s tired of feeling like a bad actress. So, she’s crafted a follow-up, Neuroplasticity (Mute), that’s even bleaker than the first, trading in the acoustic doom-folk of her debut for a richer, more expansive goth-soul that’s one-part sturm and three-parts drang. Spx will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our brand new feature on her.

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Spx: With every part of me, I adore this collection of songs by PJ Harvey. It is bewitchingly bleak. I remember being so captivated when I first heard this. I dove right in and immersed myself into the songs for weeks. More videos after the jump.

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