Category Archives: GUEST EDITOR

From The Desk Of Luna: Bruce Langhorne

With their first new music since 2004’s Rendezvous, the master Lou Reed disciples in Luna return to one of their strengths: covers. A Sentimental Education finds the quartet—Dean Wareham, Britta Phillips, Sean Eden and Lee Wall—tackling mostly obscurities by the likes of Yes, Bob Dylan, Rolling Stones, Mercury Rev and Fleetwood Mac. Simultaneously released companion piece A Place Of Greater Safety EP is all-original, however, though the six songs are instrumentals. Luna will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week.

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Wareham: Tasteful guitarist Bruce Langhorne passed away this year. He grew up in Harlem and lost a couple fingers in an accident as child. Ordinarily, this would be an impediment to a guitar player, but it worked out just fine; Langhorne would never become a shredder but instead developed his own rhythmic and chordal style. His delicate playing is the highlight of my favorite Dylan songs: the alternate take of “She Belongs To Me,” “Corrina Corrina” and “Mr Tambourine Man,” which was named for him. The story is that Langhorne played a large Turkish tambourine in studio and Dylan started calling him “Mr Tambourine Man” and wrote a song around it. Langhorne played with a lot of other folk artists, too, notably Richard and Mimi Farina, and he wrote a beautiful film score for Peter Fonda’s The Hired Hand.

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From The Desk Of Luna: “The Werner Herzog Soundtracks” By Popol Vuh

With their first new music since 2004’s Rendezvous, the master Lou Reed disciples in Luna return to one of their strengths: covers. A Sentimental Education finds the quartet—Dean Wareham, Britta Phillips, Sean Eden and Lee Wall—tackling mostly obscurities by the likes of Yes, Bob Dylan, Rolling Stones, Mercury Rev and Fleetwood Mac. Simultaneously released companion piece A Place Of Greater Safety EP is all-original, however, though the six songs are instrumentals. Luna will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week.

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Eden: Werner Herzog and Popol Vuh collaborated on five films, mostly in the ’70s, and some of the ambient and quasi-prog compositions in these movies are excellent. Also, related to this, a couple of the early Tangerine Dream records are quite good. And then, of course, there are the absolutely great Kraftwerk albums of the ’70s (Computer World is one of my favorite all-time records), not to mention albums by Neu! and Cluster and Harmonia. There’s just a vast trove of amazing electronic, ambient and soundtrack music from Germany created in that period, and it’s well worth exploring in detail.

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From The Desk Of Luna: “Song Exploder”

With their first new music since 2004’s Rendezvous, the master Lou Reed disciples in Luna return to one of their strengths: covers. A Sentimental Education finds the quartet—Dean Wareham, Britta Phillips, Sean Eden and Lee Wall—tackling mostly obscurities by the likes of Yes, Bob Dylan, Rolling Stones, Mercury Rev and Fleetwood Mac. Simultaneously released companion piece A Place Of Greater Safety EP is all-original, however, though the six songs are instrumentals. Luna will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week.

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Phillips: This is so inspiring. It makes me want to start working on my next solo album right now! Its thrilling to hear artists I admire talk about challenges that are familiar to me. There’s always something mysterious about creating songs, which can be daunting, but listening to this podcast makes it feel more exciting and fun. I read the book Songwriters On Songwriting years ago, and it’s great, but it focuses more on traditional songwriting and lyrics (plus it’s a million pages long), whereas Song Exploder episodes are around 15 minutes long and get into the music/recording process more. My favorite episodes are Angel Olsen and Julia Holter (talking about being influenced by Bowie, Eno and Bryan Ferry!) and especially, Unknown Mortal Orchestra “exploding” their amazing song/track “Multi-Love.”

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From The Desk Of Luna: Sean Eden Quotes

With their first new music since 2004’s Rendezvous, the master Lou Reed disciples in Luna return to one of their strengths: covers. A Sentimental Education finds the quartet—Dean Wareham, Britta Phillips, Sean Eden and Lee Wall—tackling mostly obscurities by the likes of Yes, Bob Dylan, Rolling Stones, Mercury Rev and Fleetwood Mac. Simultaneously released companion piece A Place Of Greater Safety EP is all-original, however, though the six songs are instrumentals. Luna will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week.

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Wall: The world is a mess. Sometimes you just need a laugh. Our guitar player Sean Eden says funny things. Oftentimes it’s unintentional. At some point, we decided this was worth sharing so we started @SeanEdenQuotes on Twitter. Sometimes we get lucky and capture a quotable moment on video like this.
Follow @SeanEdenQuotes on Twitter and Instagram today.

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From The Desk Of Luna: “Wake In Fright”

With their first new music since 2004’s Rendezvous, the master Lou Reed disciples in Luna return to one of their strengths: covers. A Sentimental Education finds the quartet—Dean Wareham, Britta Phillips, Sean Eden and Lee Wall—tackling mostly obscurities by the likes of Yes, Bob Dylan, Rolling Stones, Mercury Rev and Fleetwood Mac. Simultaneously released companion piece A Place Of Greater Safety EP is all-original, however, though the six songs are instrumentals. Luna will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week.

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Wareham: This surreal Australian film debuted at the Cannes film festival in 1971. Martin Scorsese saw it there and said, “It left me speechless.” The film then disappeared for some 40 years before being re-released in 2009. It tells of a middle-school teacher who gets stranded in a tiny Australian town—the Yabba—where the greatest insult is to refuse a glass of beer. Gambling, drinking, weird sex and a disturbing and violent kangaroo hunt follow. Hard to believe the same director Ted Kotcheff years later made Weekend At Bernie’s, but maybe I need to revisit that one.

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From The Desk Of Luna: “The Jimmy Dore Show” And “Redacted Tonight”

With their first new music since 2004’s Rendezvous, the master Lou Reed disciples in Luna return to one of their strengths: covers. A Sentimental Education finds the quartet—Dean Wareham, Britta Phillips, Sean Eden and Lee Wall—tackling mostly obscurities by the likes of Yes, Bob Dylan, Rolling Stones, Mercury Rev and Fleetwood Mac. Simultaneously released companion piece A Place Of Greater Safety EP is all-original, however, though the six songs are instrumentals. Luna will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week.

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Eden: Something that has become extremely apparent and alarming to many people in this country is the heavily edited and biased journalism and opinions put forth by mainstream media. Fox News is, of course, the absolute nadir of this on TV, but certainly MSNBC, CNN, the Washington Post and New York Times and others are also actually fairly right-wing and pro-establishment regarding many issues, especially when it comes to the military, foreign interventions, surveillance, health care, the finance/banking industries, etc. Yes, there is occasionally very good investigative journalism done by these news outlets, but it’s essential to get one’s news and opinion from other sources, too, and there are so many really incisive but also entertaining and funny news and opinion shows now. And some are just plain better than anything on mainstream television. Two of the best are The Jimmy Dore Show and Lee Camp’s Redacted Tonight. Both are true progressive voices whose shows cover a wide variety of subjects and have many fascinating guests, and they repeatedly and amusingly expose the journalistic failures and rampant propaganda within the mainstream media.

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From The Desk Of Luna: Les Panties

With their first new music since 2004’s Rendezvous, the master Lou Reed disciples in Luna return to one of their strengths: covers. A Sentimental Education finds the quartet—Dean Wareham, Britta Phillips, Sean Eden and Lee Wall—tackling mostly obscurities by the likes of Yes, Bob Dylan, Rolling Stones, Mercury Rev and Fleetwood Mac. Simultaneously released companion piece A Place Of Greater Safety EP is all-original, however, though the six songs are instrumentals. Luna will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week.

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Phillips: Dean played this band for me about a year ago. We thought they were an ’80s group that had recently been reissued, but I just discovered that the Brussels band’s album, Cold Science, is a collection of all the songs they released on their own label between 2011 and 2015, newly released by Le Disques Du Crépuscule, the Factory Records-related Belgian label. My introduction to them was sexy, cold-wave, disco track, “L’arivée.” They play real instruments, and the singer has a funny accent, but she’s super cool. They’re probably my favorite “new” band.

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From The Desk Of Luna: Jana Horn

With their first new music since 2004’s Rendezvous, the master Lou Reed disciples in Luna return to one of their strengths: covers. A Sentimental Education finds the quartet—Dean Wareham, Britta Phillips, Sean Eden and Lee Wall—tackling mostly obscurities by the likes of Yes, Bob Dylan, Rolling Stones, Mercury Rev and Fleetwood Mac. Simultaneously released companion piece A Place Of Greater Safety EP is all-original, however, though the six songs are instrumentals. Luna will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week.

Wall: I found myself in a long-distance relationship with a woman in Austin, Texas. Her birthday was coming up, but I was stuck in Los Angeles and couldn’t be with her on that day. Instead, I decided to send her flowers and thought it would also be nice to have someone sing “Happy Birthday” when the flowers arrived. I didn’t want this to be cheesy or showy. She had told me that she didn’t like the attention that usually comes with that song. But I knew that if I found the right singer, someone who could sing softly so that it wouldn’t embarrass her, it would be OK.

I didn’t know many musicians in Austin, so I went online and searched. After a lot of scrolling and listening, I found an article about a young songwriter named Jana Horn, calling her “one to watch.” I went to her website and listened to her music. She sang softly, so I knew right away that she would be perfect for this. But then I was struck by how much I liked her songs. Jana’s music, like her voice, has that unique quality of being almost whisper quiet and arresting at the same time. Stillness and motion, like a lullaby sung inside a hurricane. I was instantly pulled in as a listener, which is rare for me these days.

I emailed Jana to ask if she would be interested in singing the birthday song and was surprised at how quickly she responded, yes. A few days later, it all worked out. The flowers were delivered while Jana sang. I felt really lucky. I was just looking for someone to sing “Happy Birthday” to my girlfriend and ended up finding one of the best new artists I’ve heard in a long time. Jana Horn has a new record coming out soon, and you should buy it.

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From The Desk Of Luna: “The Future Won’t Be Long” By Jarett Kobek

With their first new music since 2004’s Rendezvous, the master Lou Reed disciples in Luna return to one of their strengths: covers. A Sentimental Education finds the quartet—Dean Wareham, Britta Phillips, Sean Eden and Lee Wall—tackling mostly obscurities by the likes of Yes, Bob Dylan, Rolling Stones, Mercury Rev and Fleetwood Mac. Simultaneously released companion piece A Place Of Greater Safety EP is all-original, however, though the six songs are instrumentals. Luna will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week.

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Wareham: Jarett Kobek’s I Hate The Internet was my favorite read of 2016, and he has followed it with an even more entertaining novel called The Future Won’t Be Long, set largely in downtown Manhattan during the the ’80s and ’90s, the era of Save The Robots, Pyramid, Limelight, parties at Bret Easton Ellis’ apartment and riots in Tompkins Square Park. The dialogue is mean and funny, and the plot follows two characters, a girl named Adeline and a boy named Baby, a soon-to-be writer of sci-fi and noir, “queer as a wooden nickel,” who moves from Podunk, Wisc., to New York City and falls in love with it:

“Oh people, oh the people, oh New York, oh your glorious people. Your Puerto Ricans, your Hebrews, your Muslims, your Chinese, your Eurotrash, that fat little fuck Norman Mailer, your uptown rich socialites, your downtown scum, your Black Americans, your Koreans, your Haitians, your Jamaicans, your Italians, your kitchen Irish, Julian Schnabel, your Far Rockaway and Staten Island white trash. Oh New York, I loved your people. They were all so beautiful! Many of them were hideous, really ugly with terrible teeth, but even the ugly ones were beautiful too! Oh I was in heaven.”

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From The Desk Of Juana Molina: Zaouli Traditional Dance

It’s a good thing that Argentine artist Juana Molina cut her showbiz teeth acting in humorous ’80s/’90s TV shows, because the singer—who’s just released her seventh album, Halo—is practically living a real-life sitcom. Her daughter Francisca, now 23, has moved out and wants nothing to do with the family business, which dates back to Molina’s high-profile folks, tango singer Horacio Molina and thespian Chunchuna Villafañe. But the comedic axis on which Molina’s life revolves is Rosa, her ex-husband’s nanny, who stayed on after their divorce more than a decade ago. Molina even penned a tune for her housemate called “The Gift,” but it didn’t make the final Halo cut. Molina will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our new feature on her.

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Molina: To me, dancing is ultimate step to happiness. I love dancing, being in trance and have the music leading you as the best partner. At the same time, I know nothing about it. I’ve been intrigued by the way these dancers don’t move the upper half of their bodies. Can someone tell me how on earth they do this? (Watch from 3:37.)

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