Search Results for: r. stevie moore

From The Desk Of Jason Falkner And R. Stevie Moore: My Wife

Ever since his departure from Jellyfish at the peak of the band’s brief early-’90s run, Jason Falkner has relished his role as a self-made power-pop iconoclast. R. Stevie Moore’s championing of the DIY recording aesthetic stretches all the way back to the late ’60s, gaining underground momentum during the following decade’s punk explosion. Unlike Falkner, Moore has never been much for restraint, recording more than 400 albums. As one might surmise, new collaboration Make It Be casts Falkner as the editor/ringmaster of Moore’s wonky sonic circus—and the results should connect with fans of the former’s innate craftsmanship and the latter’s rampant eclecticism. Falkner and Moore will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week.

Moore: Nobody has ever meant so much to me as my dear wife. My wife has been there for me, supporting my vision and ambition every step of the way. This wife has saved my life countless times, and for that I am deeply grateful. With unending love and affection.

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From The Desk Of Jason Falkner And R. Stevie Moore: My Dessert Concoction

Ever since his departure from Jellyfish at the peak of the band’s brief early-’90s run, Jason Falkner has relished his role as a self-made power-pop iconoclast. R. Stevie Moore’s championing of the DIY recording aesthetic stretches all the way back to the late ’60s, gaining underground momentum during the following decade’s punk explosion. Unlike Falkner, Moore has never been much for restraint, recording more than 400 albums. As one might surmise, new collaboration Make It Be casts Falkner as the editor/ringmaster of Moore’s wonky sonic circus—and the results should connect with fans of the former’s innate craftsmanship and the latter’s rampant eclecticism. Falkner and Moore will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week.

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Falkner: Directions:
One pint glass
Fill 3/4 up with either Ben And Jerry’s Chocolate Fudge Brownie or any dark chocolate ice cream.
Crush up four Oreo cookies and add to pint glass.
Add one tablespoon of peanut butter.
Fill glass halfway with—very important—whole milk. (If you’re watching your weight you should’ve stopped reading this ages ago.)
Now stir vigorously until you’ve hand churned the tastiest milkshake evah.

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From The Desk Of Jason Falkner And R. Stevie Moore: My Toy Bass

Ever since his departure from Jellyfish at the peak of the band’s brief early-’90s run, Jason Falkner has relished his role as a self-made power-pop iconoclast. R. Stevie Moore’s championing of the DIY recording aesthetic stretches all the way back to the late ’60s, gaining underground momentum during the following decade’s punk explosion. Unlike Falkner, Moore has never been much for restraint, recording more than 400 albums. As one might surmise, new collaboration Make It Be casts Falkner as the editor/ringmaster of Moore’s wonky sonic circus—and the results should connect with fans of the former’s innate craftsmanship and the latter’s rampant eclecticism. Falkner and Moore will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week.

Moore: The most favourite electric bass guitar I have ever played. Found by a friend at a yard sale, $20. Cruise brand (created for VMI; as in Tom). Short scale. Easy tiny toy. Fits in a soft ax bag inside the overhead compartment on my favorite jet airplanes. Lightweight and smooth. My father played the world’s best bass (mainly upright acoustic), but I had many electric bass guitars over my life. Including my first, a Teisco, then later using his Fender Jazz and Precisions. Then in Jersey I used a handmade log bass for years. I now play the Cruise exclusively, using thumb thru boomy subsonic Ampeg amps. Jah Wobble is my hero.

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From The Desk Of Jason Falkner And R. Stevie Moore: My Collection Of Vintage Instruments

Ever since his departure from Jellyfish at the peak of the band’s brief early-’90s run, Jason Falkner has relished his role as a self-made power-pop iconoclast. R. Stevie Moore’s championing of the DIY recording aesthetic stretches all the way back to the late ’60s, gaining underground momentum during the following decade’s punk explosion. Unlike Falkner, Moore has never been much for restraint, recording more than 400 albums. As one might surmise, new collaboration Make It Be casts Falkner as the editor/ringmaster of Moore’s wonky sonic circus—and the results should connect with fans of the former’s innate craftsmanship and the latter’s rampant eclecticism. Falkner and Moore will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week.

Falkner: To me, a vintage instrument (guitar in particular) is alive. It’s alive! It’s not just a few pieces of wood with strings and electronic guts. About 15 years ago, the vintage-guitar market exploded and prices soared unreasonably. I had a few pricy collectible guitars at the time, but for one reason or another (gotta pay rent, yo) had to sell most of my top shelf. This boom in prices kind of forced me to start looking at the lesser-known manufactures and models because I couldn’t afford the 335s or Les Pauls anymore. Not unlike my quest for vinyl obscurities, I became obsessed with finding ultra rare but highly playable vintage guitars. Now this is pretty much an oxymoron. Usually when you’ve never heard of or seen a particular vintage guitar it’s because the thing is an unplayable POS. Happy to report that after a couple decades of taking a chance because of a cool design or affiliation to another known manufacturer, I have amassed a small-but-ultra-personal collection of highly playable unique oddballs.

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From The Desk Of Jason Falkner And R. Stevie Moore: Women In Rock

Ever since his departure from Jellyfish at the peak of the band’s brief early-’90s run, Jason Falkner has relished his role as a self-made power-pop iconoclast. R. Stevie Moore’s championing of the DIY recording aesthetic stretches all the way back to the late ’60s, gaining underground momentum during the following decade’s punk explosion. Unlike Falkner, Moore has never been much for restraint, recording more than 400 albums. As one might surmise, new collaboration Make It Be casts Falkner as the editor/ringmaster of Moore’s wonky sonic circus—and the results should connect with fans of the former’s innate craftsmanship and the latter’s rampant eclecticism. Falkner and Moore will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week.

Moore: My favorite all-time art. Bitches in the kitchen. Foxy females really know how to pull out the raw emotion from within when it comes to making music. Boys can’t begin to touch that. Lesley Gore to Juliana Hatfield. Joan Jett and Tiffany. Wendy O. Williams begat Tori Amos. Grace Slick and Gagga. Adele, Susan Boyle. Liz Phair and the Roches. Yma Sumac vs Piaf. Pussy Riot. The Bangles raped the Go-Go’s in my dream last night. It’s little wonder why these ladies have ruled the roost when it comes to Billboard‘s top rockers (even though usually the studio engineers are men and boys—wassup widdat).

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From The Desk Of Jason Falkner And R. Stevie Moore: Japan

Ever since his departure from Jellyfish at the peak of the band’s brief early-’90s run, Jason Falkner has relished his role as a self-made power-pop iconoclast. R. Stevie Moore’s championing of the DIY recording aesthetic stretches all the way back to the late ’60s, gaining underground momentum during the following decade’s punk explosion. Unlike Falkner, Moore has never been much for restraint, recording more than 400 albums. As one might surmise, new collaboration Make It Be casts Falkner as the editor/ringmaster of Moore’s wonky sonic circus—and the results should connect with fans of the former’s innate craftsmanship and the latter’s rampant eclecticism. Falkner and Moore will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week.

Falkner: I absolutely adore Japan and the culture of the Japanese people. I have some great friends in Japan including the Cornelius people, and so because of them, my experience in Tokyo is always so cool. Love the food and tiny bars (my fave is a whisky-only bar that seats four people!) I’ve also never had a better crowd at my shows than in Japan. It feels like your average person is a completist over there. Meaning they get everything by by their favorite artists. That’s astonishing because everywhere else those people (and I’m one of them) are generally drooling and jobless haha.

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From The Desk Of Jason Falkner And R. Stevie Moore: ?

Ever since his departure from Jellyfish at the peak of the band’s brief early-’90s run, Jason Falkner has relished his role as a self-made power-pop iconoclast. R. Stevie Moore’s championing of the DIY recording aesthetic stretches all the way back to the late ’60s, gaining underground momentum during the following decade’s punk explosion. Unlike Falkner, Moore has never been much for restraint, recording more than 400 albums. As one might surmise, new collaboration Make It Be casts Falkner as the editor/ringmaster of Moore’s wonky sonic circus—and the results should connect with fans of the former’s innate craftsmanship and the latter’s rampant eclecticism. Falkner and Moore will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week.

Moore: The question mark—wow, we have been together forever. My all-time favourite exclamation symbol. So happy am I to be trapped in a world constantly stuck with indecision, confusion, vague lack of explanation. Nothing defined, therefore, my friend the ?: BFF. Sorry I don’t think I am doing this very well, forgive my instabilities. Hope it’s usable, it’s the best I can do. Just trying to fit in.

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From The Desk Of Jason Falkner And R. Stevie Moore: Obscurities

Ever since his departure from Jellyfish at the peak of the band’s brief early-’90s run, Jason Falkner has relished his role as a self-made power-pop iconoclast. R. Stevie Moore’s championing of the DIY recording aesthetic stretches all the way back to the late ’60s, gaining underground momentum during the following decade’s punk explosion. Unlike Falkner, Moore has never been much for restraint, recording more than 400 albums. As one might surmise, new collaboration Make It Be casts Falkner as the editor/ringmaster of Moore’s wonky sonic circus—and the results should connect with fans of the former’s innate craftsmanship and the latter’s rampant eclecticism. Falkner and Moore will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week.

Falkner: Ever since I can remember I was interested in things no one had heard of or told me about. I developed a strong suspicion of what came down the mainstream pipeline at a surprisingly young age so I’ve always been more interested in things that aren’t “sold” to you by someone or something (like a corporation). I get such a kick out of finding “the great lost classic” and have definitely stumbled onto quite a few. It used to be much harder to find these gems. You had to take a chance just because the cover looked cool or maybe you recognized the producer, a band members name or even the record label and so you bought it … without hearing it. Imagine that in 2017! The cool thing about that was you actually gave the record a fighting chance to become important to you. Give it many listens before moving on. It widened my scope of taste for sure. People’s reaction when I play these records? Always the same. “Why the hell haven’t I heard this before?”

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From The Desk Of Jason Falkner And R. Stevie Moore: ’50s West Coast Bop Jazz

Ever since his departure from Jellyfish at the peak of the band’s brief early-’90s run, Jason Falkner has relished his role as a self-made power-pop iconoclast. R. Stevie Moore’s championing of the DIY recording aesthetic stretches all the way back to the late ’60s, gaining underground momentum during the following decade’s punk explosion. Unlike Falkner, Moore has never been much for restraint, recording more than 400 albums. As one might surmise, new collaboration Make It Be casts Falkner as the editor/ringmaster of Moore’s wonky sonic circus—and the results should connect with fans of the former’s innate craftsmanship and the latter’s rampant eclecticism. Falkner and Moore will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week.

Moore: My bassist father Bob brought 12-inch LPs home when I was a young boy. I thought they were the coolest motherfucking things in the world. Mainly labels like Bethlehem, Contemporary and Prestige. The fiery smooth music on these vinyls blew my mind forever. My actual third all-time favourite genre. Oops, this post is bad. Maybe? Absentminded scatterbrain.

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From The Desk Of Jason Falkner And R. Stevie Moore: Pappy And Harriet’s In Pioneer Town, Joshua Tree

Ever since his departure from Jellyfish at the peak of the band’s brief early-’90s run, Jason Falkner has relished his role as a self-made power-pop iconoclast. R. Stevie Moore’s championing of the DIY recording aesthetic stretches all the way back to the late ’60s, gaining underground momentum during the following decade’s punk explosion. Unlike Falkner, Moore has never been much for restraint, recording more than 400 albums. As one might surmise, new collaboration Make It Be casts Falkner as the editor/ringmaster of Moore’s wonky sonic circus—and the results should connect with fans of the former’s innate craftsmanship and the latter’s rampant eclecticism. Falkner and Moore will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week.

Falkner: I’ve been going to this outlaw BBQ/bar/live venue for ages, and it’s like a master reset for my sanity. The California desert has the widest sky and the most amazing star gazing/UFO spotting on a clear night. I usually stay at the little motel maybe 200 feet from Pappys, which enables the most convenient drunken back and forth imaginable. Shoes come off as soon as I park. The feel of the desert sand under my feet is pure joy.

Another photo after the jump.

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